Parental Education Growth Support

Parental Education Growth Support (PEGS) is a relatively new organisation that works from Shrewsbury. It aims to provide therapeutic, practical and emotional support, and run effective programmes and training that raise awareness and understanding about child to parent abuse. PEGS offers one-to-one emotional and practical support to parents, carers and guardians who are living with children who display abusive, violent, or out-of-control behaviours. It runs an online weekly drop-in, and training for professionals on child to parent abuse. The organisation has completed facilitator programme training for the ‘Who’s in Charge’ programme and so far has delivered four courses that have been well received.

At the Foundation’s October 2020 meeting, Trustees confirmed a grant offer of £5,000. This will contribute towards the general running costs of PEGS. The organisation has supported more than 200 families this year, and anticipates numbers to increase quickly as the effects of the lockdown and COVID restrictions are played out.

www.pegsupport.com

Norwich International Youth Project

This charity supports around 150 young asylum seekers and refugees across Norfolk – with a large proportion aged between 18 and 25. Many of the young people arrived as Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children and have little family or other support, and some young adults are in shared accommodation that has been made available for asylum seekers whilst the UK is under COVID lockdown restrictions. Support is provided with drop-in activities, groups, and English classes. The young people benefit from interaction and support from trusted adults, and through peer support and friendship with others who are in a similar position.

At the October 2020 meeting, Trustees agreed funding of £4,000 per year for two years. The grant will help with the costs of rent for the spaces used for the weekly group sessions. Overall outcomes for the asylum seekers and refugees involved include improved English, improved wellbeing and resilience, and better access to opportunities and further education and employment.

www.niyp.org.uk

Supported – The Community Eating Disorder Charity

The Linda Tremble Foundation, which has recently rebranded as Supported, aims to provide access to community based group support for people with an eating disorder and their families.  It works across different areas of Scotland through running support groups, and is based near the town of Cupar in Fife.  Supported also provides carers with training based on the New Maudsley Approach – designed to equip carers with a similar skill set to that used in a specialist inpatient setting, in order to provide in-home support to family members/friends with an eating disorder.  It also offers information, one-to-one befriending, phone and videoconference support.  Prior to the pandemic, support groups were established in Fife, Forth Valley, Glasgow and Perth and help people feel less isolated, and build their self-confidence and resilience to develop strategies that will aid their recovery.  The Foundation is currently providing access to support for over 50 people with eating disorders and 25 families.

In October 2020, a grant of £7,718 has been agreed towards Supported. This will cover costs of recruiting, training and supporting an additional 20 volunteers over the coming year, and four training sessions. Trained volunteers will deliver support by facilitating new groups, supporting existing ones, and providing one-to-one support to individuals through our Befriending Service. Overall these volunteer led services will  help to reduce isolation, improve support mechanisms for individuals with an eating disorder, and raise awareness.

www.supportedscotland.org

Our Special Friends

This charity seeks to support and enhance the companionship and bond between people and their pets. It operates from Newmarket and covers West Suffolk. The work includes practical help for vulnerable or isolated people to manage their existing pets; visits from volunteers with a pet to lonely older people who are missing animal companionship; and help with looking after pets whilst people are in hospital or unable to manage due to illness or frailty. The charity is actively supporting around 150 people at any one time. A further 100 older people benefit through volunteers and their accredited pets making visits to local care homes and dementia units when COVID restrictions are not in place.

The Allen Lane Foundation has agreed a two-year grant totalling £7,000 to Our Special Friends. This will help with general running costs. Outcomes of the work include improved mental, emotional and physical health; reduced isolation and loneliness; and an increased capacity for older people to live independently.

www.ourspecialfriends.org